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Mary Walshok

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Dr. Mary Walshok is an author, educator, researcher, and Associate Vice Chancellor for Public Programs and Dean of Extension at the University of California San Diego. She is a thought leader and subject matter expert on aligning workforce development with regional economic growth. 

 
She is the author of more than 100 articles and reports on regional innovation, the role of research institutions in regional economies and workforce development. She has authored and co-authored numerous book chapters and articles on the world of work, including: Blue Collar Women (1981), Knowledge Without Boundaries: What America's Research Universities Can Do for the Economy, the Workplace, and the Community (1995), Closing America's Job Gap (2011) and Invention and Reinvention: The Evolution of San Diego's Entrepreneurial Economy (2013). 
 
As an industrial social scientist studying the dynamics of regional economic development and transformation, Walshok has studied various communities across America. She has evaluated 13 WIRED regions funded by the U.S. Department of Labor, studied three innovative regions for a National Science Foundation-funded project, and assessed one region’s efforts to grow an industry for a Lilly Foundation-funded endeavor.
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Rancho San Andres creates the first TIF abattoir for ostrich meat in Latin America

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Delitruz

The company Rancho San Andres worked for four years to create a specialized abattoir for the management of ostrich meat in order to get certified as Federal Inspection Type (TIF), a goal that it recently accomplished becoming the first company in Latin America to have an establishment of this type.

Located in the State of Mexico, Rancho San Andrés produces a thousand of ostriches for slaughter annually, generating 35 tons of meat, of which 80% sold through supermarket chains, and 20% by dealers, all under the brand Delitruz.

For the brothers Sergio and Ricardo Guzmán, the company founders, it was clear that they needed to create from scratch an abattoir in order to obtain the TIF certification, because "without certification we could only serve the local market, and now we can take our product to distribution centers nationwide," said Sergio Guzmán, Executive Director of the company.

The TIF certification means that an abattoir receives permanent health inspection to ensure food safety. According to SAGARPA, these establishments "are designed to obtain optimal hygiene products sanitary quality with international recognition, since they have inspection systems and high level controls that promote the reduction of pollution risks."

Therefore, the TIF certification opens to Rancho San Andrés the opportunity to bring their products to the entire country and beyond. "Before, we could only meet 20% of domestic demand, as currently our trading volume is a ton and can reach up to four, but the national demand is 10 tons per month," says the entrepreneur.

While this certification can be seen as the achievement of a company, the Guzman brothers consider it a breakthrough for the industry. "This certification will detonate livestock production nationally because there were many people who wanted to invest in this production system, but could not do it because there were no buyers, and there were not because there was no certification process," Guzman said.

As if that were not enough, also the international market is presented as a great opportunity, because ostrich meat is sold increasingly due to its low in calories, cholesterol and fat, and high in iron and protein, according the Mexican Council for the Promotion of ostrich meat.

"Internationally it opens up a whole range of possibilities of marketing because with the TIF certification we are able to meet the requirements of almost any country, and that opens a huge market worldwide that is demanding several thousand tons of ostrich meat", says the entrepreneur.

Rancho San Andrés began working with the FUMEC's business support programs in 2011; since then, it has received consulting by the Foundation to improve their production processes, to train their staff on safety issues and to get the TIF certification.

The company Rancho San Andres worked for four years to create a specialized abattoir for the management of ostrich meat in order to get certified as Federal Inspection Type (TIF), a goal that it recently accomplished becoming the first company in Latin America to have an establishment of this type.

 

Located in the State of Mexico, Rancho San Andrés produces a thousand of ostriches for slaughter annually, generating 35 tons of meat, of which 80% sold through supermarket chains, and 20% by dealers, all under the brand Delitruz.

 

For the brothers Sergio and Ricardo Guzmán, the company founders, it was clear that they needed to create from scratch an abattoir in order to obtain the TIF certification, because "without certification we could only serve the local market, and now we can take our product to distribution centers nationwide," said Sergio Guzmán, Executive Director of the company.

 

The TIF certification means that an abattoir receives permanent health inspection to ensure food safety. According to SAGARPA, these establishments "are designed to obtain optimal hygiene products sanitary quality with international recognition, since they have inspection systems and high level controls that promote the reduction of pollution risks."

 

Therefore, the TIF certification opens to Rancho San Andrés the opportunity to bring their products to the entire country and beyond. "Before, we could only meet 20% of domestic demand, as currently our trading volume is a ton and can reach up to four, but the national demand is 10 tons per month," says the entrepreneur.

 

While this certification can be seen as the achievement of a company, the Guzman brothers consider it a breakthrough for the industry. "This certification will detonate livestock production nationally because there were many people who wanted to invest in this production system, but could not do it because there were no buyers, and there were not because there was no certification process," Guzman said.

 

As if that were not enough, also the international market is presented as a great opportunity, because ostrich meat is sold increasingly due to its low in calories, cholesterol and fat, and high in iron and protein, according the Mexican Council for the Promotion of ostrich meat.

 

"Internationally it opens up a whole range of possibilities of marketing because with the TIF certification we are able to meet the requirements of almost any country, and that opens a huge market worldwide that is demanding several thousand tons of ostrich meat", says the entrepreneur.

 

Rancho San Andrés began working with the FUMEC's business support programs in 2011; since then, it has received consulting by the Foundation to improve their production processes, to train their staff on safety issues and to get the TIF certification.

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Keith Patridge

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patridgeWith 25 years of working at the McAllen Economic Development Corporation and McAllen Foreign Trade Zone, Mr. Keith Patridge has a great deal of experience in assisting companies with their start-up operations in either McAllen, TX or Reynosa, MX. He has worked with Global Companies planning a strategic move or expansion to service their industry from a cost competitive market.

Mr. Patridge and his team maintain a strong international relationship with Mexico and work closely with Mexican officials in Reynosa, Tamaulipas, to attract new investment, develop infrastructure, enhance workforce education and training, and promote the construction of worker housing.

Mr. Patridge’s experience in business development, sales, operations, and general management for a number of national & international companies has provided him insight into the important elements required to successfully start up new operations in McAllen and Reynosa.

Mr. Patridge holds two Bachelor degrees from Missouri Western State College and a Doctorate of Jurisprudence from the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

 

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Lars R. Christianson

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LarsC
Christianson studied Chemical Engineering at the Universidad Iberoamericana (1966) and the Master of Business Administration at the Stanford University in the United States.

From 1970-1972 he worked for Citibank Mexico as Deputy Director of Planning. In 1972 he joined Inter Leases where he was Director of Credit.

In 1973 he joined the  Christianson company as Technical Director, of which he was CEO from 1987 until the sale of the company in 2000 to the Swiss company Clariant. Christianson was one of the leading manufacturers of surfactants in Mexico.

Lars Christianson was president of the National Association of Chemical Industry of Mexico from 1982 to 1984. He received the National Prize for Chemistry in 1985.

He has consulted in various organizations such as the National Bank of Mexico, Mexico Horizon Investment Company, Union Carbide, Petrochemical Grupo Beta, Fausto García Asociados, and the Board of the School of Chemistry of the UNAM.